The New Church

The new Church of St Werbugh is in Bent Lane, about half a mile from the medieval church. It is built of Runcorn sandstone in the early Perpendicular style.

The north-east tower contains eight bells. The church cost £9,000 to build, and that cost was borne by the patron, Mr R E Egerton-Warburton. The architect was John Douglas, whose fine work is seen not just in this Church, but also in the Parish Room built in 1889 and the Post OFfice at the corner of Dunham Road built in 1893.

What to Look Out For in the Church

The carved statue of St Werburgh above the porch. St Werburgh was a 7th century nun.

The churchwarden’s staff of 1811.

Paintings on the wall showing this church and the old church – one a baptism depicting parishioners past and present, the other a scene through the door.

The font cover of 1595.

The oak parish chest with its 3 antique locks.

The replica of the Domesday Book which mentions the village under is name Wareburghtune.

The fine carvings on the front choir stalls illustrating musicians in Psalm 150.

The altar frontals – the white frontal was embroidered by Mother Kate of Haggerston in the Victorian period.

The Bells of St Werburgh’s Church

There are eight bells in the tower. Seven of them are inscribed with verses from the Beatitudes:

Blessed are they that suffer persecution

Blessed are the peacemakers

Blessed are the clean of heart

Blessed are the merciful

Blessed are they that hunger and thirst

Blessed are they that mourn

Blessed are the meek

The tenor has the following inscription:

I bid you to the house of prayer

St Werburgh’s hallowed name I bear

Good folk draw near and humbly pray

As prayed that saint in olden day

Anno Dom 1884